SUPRA CURRICULUM BUILDING

A supra curriculum includes activities, events and learning that enrich what already goes on in the classroom. Watch the interactive video introduction to supra curriculums below:

 

 

The supra curriculum differs from extra and co-curricular programmes because it deepens and enriches academic learning, provides time and space to make authentic connections with students, and can make up for some of the limitations of exam driven academic courses. You can read more about supra curriculums here and find more examples of the supra curriculum relating to real-world global issues here.

The example below relates to a supra curriculum session on eco-citizenship. It begins with the following bespoke interactive video content:

ECO-CITIZENSHIP

Intellectual character can be developed in supra curriculum time. Curiosity, investigation, the use of mental models, critical thinking, self regulation, motivation and resilience can be just some of the aspects of life that students can practise and develop while taking part in a supra curriculum.

Building a supra curriculum takes time to research and build. The following is an example of a supra curriculum activity that could span three hours and is suitable for students aged between 12 and 18. The purpose of this Eco-Citizenship supra curriculum programme is to develop critical thinking, creativity, communication and collaboration. In addition, students will develop a sense of responsible local and global citizenship as they draw upon a multi disciplinary prompts.

one

Phase

The first phase involves sharing prompts about living an ecologically friendly lifestyle with students. Distribution of these sources of information is discretionary. This worked example will demonstrate the process with groups of five students each receiving one of the five prompts shown below:

SOURCE PROMPTS

GOOD

ENERGY

BBC

NEWS

SUSTAINABLE

JUNGLE

ECO FRIENDLY

HABITS

HAYLEY HIGDON TEDxYouth TALK

TWO

Phase

The second phase requires students to precis their source. This helps them to articulate concisely the main message of the source material. They are asked to identify three main ideas or issues covered by the author and then construct a single sentence summary that conveys the main message within the source shared with them. A worksheet can be provided as follows:

SOURCE TASK.png

THREE

Phase

The third phase requires students to evaluate their source in terms of its credibility. This helps them to think critically about the sources of information they have consulted rather than accept them at face value. A teacher should circulate using challenging Socratic questioning during this process (Socratic question prompts can be provided). A worksheet can be provided as follows and a credibility checklist can be consulted to help prompt this critical thinking:

Credibility.png
Credibility Checker (A4 Document).png
Credibility Checker (A4 Document) (1).png

FOUR

Phase

The fourth phase requires students to share with their group the main themes of their source so that the group of five all have a grasp of each source of information. Individual, students 'sketch note' the main ideas of their source. This is likely to be based on their work in phase two.

 

They may also illustrate or draw diagrams to show what most interested or shocked them about their source. Once this has been completed, each student takes a turn to show their sketch to their group and talk through what it shows. A worksheet can be provided to support this process:

Sketchnoting worksheets landscape.png

FIVE

Phase

The fifth phase requires students to consider the importance of this issue from an individual, communitarian, and global perspective. Depending on the size of the group, the teacher may ask students to call upon a student representative from each group to vocalise their three ideas or perhaps add their ideas on post its stuck to a wall for the rest of the group to peruse. A worksheet can be provided to support this process:

3ys.png

SIX

Phase

The sixth phase requires students to work as a group to construct an argument in support of living a sustainable eco-conscious lifestyle.

They will use the Toulmin framework to help them construct their writing. The Toulmin method is a style of argumentation that breaks arguments into six component parts. In collaboration with each other, students will communicate their claim, grounds, warrant, qualifier, rebuttal and backing.

The students may use additional resources to connect with their now prior knowledge about eco-citizenship. They will need to build their credibility by considering counter balanced points or rebuttals to their arguments. They could look at the ecotree website here as a starting point, ensuring they follow the credibility checks they have already learned.

 

The students will then create their own presentations using their preferred method or they could use the PowerPoint template provided to support them in their delivery. All of the groups can judge the effectiveness of each of the presentations using the Toulmin method. They could give each group a score out of six for the six component parts required. The resources mentioned here can be seen below:

3ys (1).png
Slide12.PNG
Slide20.PNG
Slide5.PNG
Slide18.PNG
Slide16.PNG
Slide4.PNG
Slide17.PNG
Slide1.PNG
Slide19.PNG
Slide9.PNG
Slide13.PNG
Slide3.PNG
Slide2.PNG
Slide7.PNG
Slide6.PNG
Slide11.PNG
Slide8.PNG
Slide10.PNG
Work Desk

CONTACT ME

If you are interested in building a supra curriculum (real-world issues, digital disruption for business students, project management and philosophical thinking workshops) to help your students develop and practise critical thinking, creative problem solving, collaboration and communication skills, please get in touch with me.

Thanks for submitting!

  • YouTube
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter